OSDev.org

The Place to Start for Operating System Developers
It is currently Thu Jun 27, 2019 12:42 am

All times are UTC - 6 hours




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 6 posts ] 
Author Message
 Post subject: [8-bit Guy] video on the Tandy 1000 computers circa 1984-88
PostPosted: Sun Dec 30, 2018 8:38 am 
Offline
Member
Member
User avatar

Joined: Fri Oct 27, 2006 9:42 am
Posts: 1456
Location: Athens, GA, USA
For anyone who is interested in PC history.

_________________
Rev. First Speaker Schol-R-LEA;2 LCF ELF JAM POEE KoR KCO PPWMTF
μή εἶναι βασιλικήν ἀτραπόν ἐπί γεωμετρίαν
Lisp programmers tend to seem very odd to outsiders, just like anyone else who has had a religious experience they can't quite explain to others.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: [8-bit Guy] video on the Tandy 1000 computers circa 1984
PostPosted: Sun Dec 30, 2018 1:21 pm 
Offline
Member
Member
User avatar

Joined: Fri Aug 07, 2015 6:13 am
Posts: 1022
It seems like I'm not the only one watching the 8-bit Guy. :D
Very interesting and easily understandable content.
Old computers were a lot more interesting and DIY/programming/electronics focused/friendlier, wish we had something like that today.

_________________
OS: Basic OS
About: 32 Bit Monolithic Kernel Written in C++ and Assembly, Custom FAT 32 Bootloader


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: [8-bit Guy] video on the Tandy 1000 computers circa 1984
PostPosted: Sun Dec 30, 2018 3:14 pm 
Offline
Member
Member

Joined: Tue Mar 04, 2014 5:27 am
Posts: 965
Octacone wrote:
Old computers were a lot more interesting and DIY/programming/electronics focused/friendlier, wish we had something like that today.


I missed most of it (you can't choose where and when you're born, sigh).

These days you have plenty of stuff to play with, but the feel is different. It's no longer something novel or cutting-edge, just a simplified and less powerful version of the PC you've already been using (I mean the Arduino and SBCs with lots of I/O ports, some capable of running a full Linux distro with graphics and all).


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: [8-bit Guy] video on the Tandy 1000 computers circa 1984
PostPosted: Tue Feb 05, 2019 2:31 pm 
Offline
Member
Member
User avatar

Joined: Mon May 22, 2017 5:56 am
Posts: 75
alexfru wrote:
These days you have plenty of stuff to play with, but the feel is different. It's no longer something novel or cutting-edge, just a simplified and less powerful version of the PC you've already been using (I mean the Arduino and SBCs with lots of I/O ports, some capable of running a full Linux distro with graphics and all).

I agree. I think there's more fun to be had in software.

Different programming languages offer radically different solutions. Lisp blew my mind despite my only learning a sort of cheap bad Lisp. Forth amazed me with the power of delving into the language, then seduced me with its extremely flexible syntax which is in part a consequence of that power. Even Tcl offers mind-blowing possibilities in playing with variable scope.

You can come up with operating systems completely unlike either Linux or Windows. Plan 9 blew my mind despite its various faults. It's extremely expressive with very little code. You can export *anything* on the network so long as the latency isn't too high. (That's one of the faults.) You can do almost anything with shell script. (So close!) Some OSs inspired me by providing identical user environments whether on real hardware or hosted under another operating system. Those were Inferno and Active Oberon. Oberon had previously inspired Rob Pike to create the Acme text editor, which in turn inspires me. There's all this network of inspiration, at least half of which is alien to even the progressive projects in the Linux world.

None of these things are new, but they're not part of the mainstream. There's room for experiment. There's room to create new things, whether with them or inspired by them. There's room to try not-so-new things which you just don't normally see, and have your mind blown by them! Then experiment with the concepts that blew your mind!

Personally, I'm taking inspiration and experience from Plan 9, improving it, adding other ideas of my own, and implementing in Forth. I'm also tempted to take on a challenge: Using tricks from Plan 9, how powerful and flexible an operating system can I make for an 8-bit computer?

You know, there is room for experiment in hardware. It's impossible to get near the miniaturization and performance of manufactured hardware, but see above challenge. I think it's possible to hand-build a serial computer faster than 100MHz. The limit there is the memory, making even a kilobit of serial memory out of transistors would be an excruciatingly repetitive task, and the result would be large. Perhaps data could be streamed to and from it with an Ethernet interface. Haha! I forgot all about FPGAs when I wrote that. They would help, to say the least!

_________________
Laos or: How I learned to stop worrying and love imperative programming


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: [8-bit Guy] video on the Tandy 1000 computers circa 1984
PostPosted: Tue Feb 05, 2019 2:49 pm 
Offline
Member
Member
User avatar

Joined: Mon Apr 18, 2016 9:50 am
Posts: 138
Location: New York New York
Quote:
I think it's possible to hand-build a serial computer faster than 100MHz. The limit there is the memory, making even a kilobit of serial memory out of transistors would be an excruciatingly repetitive task, and the result would be large.


On an FPGA, totally, without question. With discrete transistors? Not a snowball's chance in hell. Getting above 10MHz on a hand-wired board using highly integrated ICs is dicey in and of itself due to stray capacitance and inductance issues alone, forget about the crazy propagation delays you'd be talking about with discrete trannies.

_________________
The OS is P5. Don't expect it to build.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: [8-bit Guy] video on the Tandy 1000 computers circa 1984
PostPosted: Wed Jun 12, 2019 7:14 am 
Offline

Joined: Wed Jun 12, 2019 6:01 am
Posts: 2
Location: Neptune
Oh, I love his videos too! Since I discovered AVGN I also began watching other retro bloggers like 8-Bit Guy and LGR. I'm glad these guys are still on. Here's one of my favorite LGR vids:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fbjYkPKRm-8
I have two retro PCs myself: one is a 486 DOS-machine similar to that one in the video, the other one is Pentium 4 running on WinXP. Such nostalgia is obvious, I keep them for gaming mostly, I don't play modern games, except maybe this one. I guess I'm stuck in 90s-2000s this point.


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 6 posts ] 

All times are UTC - 6 hours


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group