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 Post subject: Re:Book Recommendations
PostPosted: Sat Nov 30, 2002 11:29 am 
While not directly related to OS development, the McGraw-Hill A+ Certification All-in-One Exam Guide (the current edition is ISBN 0-07-212679-5) by testing guru Michael Meyers gives a surprisingly good overview and reference for PC hardware and DOS/Windows software. I have found it to be much better than the alternative texts, and for the A+ tests themselves it was if anything overkill (not that that is difficult; I found the tests to be easy, but I had several years experience behind me and had spend four months studying for them). The only real problem is that is extremely wordy and discursive for a study guide, which puts some people off and makes getting specific information a bit of chore. It is excellently organized, however, which makes up for this to large degree If you prefer a more concise book, Meyer's A+ Exam Passport is a heavily edited version of the same material, much more direct and far cheaper, but less complete and IMHO a bit choppy to read through.

While it may have little direct relevance to OS programming, it is a very good idea to get a solid feeling for the hardware, on at least a general system-assembly level if not necessarily the component (i.e., ICs and circuit traces) level. I would say that my experience as in tech support has given me some insight into programming that I wouldn't have had otherwise. I would say it would be a Good Thing for any programmer to have the experience of assembling and setting up a PC from parts at least once; I expect a lot of those on this message board have already done so.


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 Post subject: Re:Book Recommendations
PostPosted: Sat Dec 07, 2002 11:48 am 
For the few who didn't know about it, seminar guru Bruce Eckel's books on Python, C++, Java, C#, and Design Patterns are all available for downloading at MindView Books. HTH.


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 Post subject: Re:Book Recommendations
PostPosted: Tue Dec 10, 2002 11:46 pm 
OS Theory:
1. AST's Design and Implementation of Operating System (Theory + Praticle)
2. Operating System Concepts, 6th Edition -- by Abraham Silberschatz (theory)
3. Design of the Unix Operating System by Marice J. Bach (Classic work)
4. The Design and Implementation of the 4.4BSD Operating System (Network/FS issues are in great details) (3 and 4 are said to be even inspiring to Linus. :) )
5. Inside Windows 2000. Really worth reading book! Considering domination it enjoys! Of course, it comes from good OS of course!

Processor:
In addition to Intel Manuals,
1. Advanced 80386 Programming Techniques, Jim Turley, McGraw-Hill
2. The Indispensable PC Hardware Book: Your Hardware Questions Answered (3rd Edition), Hans-Peter Messmer
3. Protected Mode Software Architecture (The PC System Architecture Series) by Tom Shanley

As usual, details can be found on Amazon.com

But IMHO, read them, you will understand what you want to do. Design it as simple as possible. Then develop, This may take 6-8 months. Once this is done, you can have something that works and called as OS. :)

Well, am my self on Second month as on 12/11/02. :)

ADi.


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 Post subject: Re:Book Recommendations
PostPosted: Tue Dec 17, 2002 1:44 pm 
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"PC Assembly Language"
www.drpaulcarter.com/pcasm/
It has assembly lang code + allows downloading code demonstrating interfac for DJGPP, Win32 etc. based C/C++ code.
Regards,
Aditya.

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 Post subject: Book Recommendations for Germans
PostPosted: Sun Jan 12, 2003 4:37 am 
There is only one book an German assembly programmer should have :

"Assembler GE-PACKT" - ISBN 3-8266-0786-4


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 Post subject: Re:Book Recommendations
PostPosted: Fri Feb 07, 2003 4:11 pm 
I am currently borrowing Intel's 80386 System Software Writer's Guide from the Oakland Public Library, and I must say, it is eye-opening. Even just skimming through it I could see that it would be at least as valuable than the 80386 Programmer's Reference Manual (which I picked up for a song some time ago, and which has been one of my primary references). It clarifies a lot of details that were unclear before. It even discusses a possible approach towards implementing of System V Unix (though I haven't read that part yet). Interesting.

Unfortunately, unlike the Programmer's Reference Manual, it does not seem to be be available online on Intel's website or through Sandpile.org. My recommendation is to keep a sharp look out for it in any libraries or bookstores, or perhaps look it up on Amazon or Powell's.


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 Post subject: Re:Book Recommendations
PostPosted: Fri Mar 28, 2003 5:55 pm 
a very good book on distributed operating systems.
very much detail is there.

distributed operating systems concepts and design
by pradeep k. sinha, ieee press.

:)


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 Post subject: Re:Book Recommendations
PostPosted: Fri Mar 28, 2003 6:07 pm 
ok, there is another book on assembly language
programming, the text and examples are very easy
to follow

good for a newbie and intermediate programmer
8)

assembly language programming and organization
of the ibm pc, by ytha yu and cahrles marut.
mcgraw hill, 0-07-112896-4.


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 Post subject: Re:Book Recommendations
PostPosted: Sat Mar 29, 2003 11:33 pm 
mmmm."Operating Systems: Design and Implementation"is good


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 Post subject: Re:Book Recommendations
PostPosted: Sun May 04, 2003 1:46 pm 
If you do a 'google' search for MMURTL now, you can find the whole book (in pdf)



Tim Robinson wrote:
I'd agree with K.J. on the MMURTL book. Although I haven't read the whole thing, I did read the first chapter on the book's web site. It gave me the impression that this was the author's first attempt at writing an OS and that he was so pleased with himself for getting something running that he went out and wrote a book about it. Better to take advice from someone more experienced like Andy Tanenbaum.


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 Post subject: Re:Book Recommendations
PostPosted: Tue May 20, 2003 3:57 am 
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informit has a nice collection of articles from Andrew Tanenbaum that is available for online reading (though you must register to get a "printer-friendly" version.

I've gone through 3 of them, and they seem pretty interresting - though rather not as much technical as a a tutorial could be ...

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 Post subject: Re:Book Recommendations
PostPosted: Fri Jun 13, 2003 5:11 am 
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For those who know German and are looking for an "easy" introduction on the subject of OS internals, I recommend:

Nehmer / Sturm, "Systemsoftware".

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 Post subject: Re:Book Recommendations
PostPosted: Mon Jul 28, 2003 6:07 am 
I can't decide which book to by:
    [Operating System Concepts]
    [Operating Systems: Design and Implementation(2nd edition)]

So which one is better for me? I want to code my own little OS while reading the book. That means I need some practical stuff from the book. Not just theory. Which one?


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 Post subject: Re:Book Recommendations
PostPosted: Mon Jul 28, 2003 2:59 pm 
pullor wrote:
I can't decide which book to by:
    [Operating System Concepts]
    [Operating Systems: Design and Implementation(2nd edition)]
So which one is better for me? I want to code my own little OS while reading the book. That means I need some practical stuff from the book. Not just theory. Which one?


The Minix book (Operating Systems: Design and Implementation) is definitely more pragmatically oriented that Silbershatz's is, and for most people, it is more understandable as well. YMMV, of course.

For those who might be wondering, I've decided to come back as a member again; when I started posting as `The Pro from Dover', I only intended to visit briefly, but it seems just couldn't stay away ;) I'm going to try and keep my posting time to a minimum, as I still need to put most of my efforts into jobhunting. Nonetheless, it's good to be back.


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 Post subject: Re:Book Recommendations
PostPosted: Mon Jul 28, 2003 5:29 pm 
Schol-R-LEA wrote:
For those who might be wondering, I've decided to come back as a member again; when I started posting as `The Pro from Dover', I only intended to visit briefly, but it seems just couldn't stay away ;)

The quality of your posts gave you away almost straight away :). Good luck with your job hunting -- if only you could find a job in OS development!


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