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 Post subject: Applications of OSDev
PostPosted: Fri Aug 18, 2017 1:36 pm 
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Joined: Wed Jul 19, 2017 9:46 pm
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Hey there, folks!

Apologies for making the title so generic (and possibly misleading), but I've had something on my mind lately...

Due to personal circumstances, last year I had to drop out of university (medical-related). Problem is, my financial aid, a willfully-chosen and devastating system here in the US, has officially run out. No more help to pay. This is disadvantageous because I come from a not-so-affluent family and would like to continue forward pursuing a CompSci bachelor's degree.

So basically what I'm here in the off-topic section to ask about is whether or not having my own home-brew OS would be a leg up over new grads if I can develop it into something very complex. Right now it is still in its inception: a basic GUI video driver (finally out of mode 03h), but still primarily shell-mode with a VGA driver (text mode), no FS because of USB booting (damn that 600+ page USB spec :roll: ), etc etc. Not so bad for Orchid being a little over a month old.

Would my OS provide leverage in the hiring process, even though I only have a mere business associate's degree? These days getting a good job is akin to breaking into a military outpost, no matter how much the government inflates our statistics.

This is not to make it seem like I'm here at OSDev for leverage -- I love doing this. Regardless of how much or little it helps me, I will continue developing my 32-bit OS in full assembly, and will eventually implement a UEFI x64/long-mode variant of my OS in C when I have the experience of the initial project behind me.

Thanks, hope everyone has a wonderful day!
-human

P.S. I like appositive parentheses. :mrgreen:

_________________
orchid OS, project progress:
  • T1: Legacy booting, (G/I)DT&ISRs, systime, heap (flat model, not paged), dynamic video mode selection.
  • T2: PCI & basic drivers, filesystem, ELF/PE, multitasking.


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 Post subject: Re: Applications of OSDev
PostPosted: Fri Aug 18, 2017 4:06 pm 
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Certain employers in the driver-development and virtualization software industries will look favorably on knowledge and practice with OS development, even though it is an esoteric hobby project. I know, because I have seen people apply this to their advantage. Familiarity with existing mainstream OSes may sometimes be more helpful, depending on the exact needs of the employer. If you mean high-level application development, I cannot guarantee that it wont be even an obstacle to being hired. :)


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 Post subject: Re: Applications of OSDev
PostPosted: Fri Aug 18, 2017 6:02 pm 
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to be absolutely honest with you, this kind of skills are not honored any more. nowdays, corporations are looking for trained software operators, who can click in sap, or can put down a windows on c# where no real programming is needed to create any program, just a data processing interface.

today, computer industry is changed, computers are just clients displaying image files, diagrams, and terminals to send emails, enter an item to an ERP, or to send messages on facebook to somebody who you are dating, or watch videos, listen musics.

none of the above requires programming

with programming skills, you can be a freelancer developer, a game developer, an embedded system developer, or you can create something where programming is needed as an ,,added value'', so where not the software is the product, instead, you write the software to more efficiently create something (like you are mixing some acids to create some material which needs a program to precisely rotate it for x time, then it must rotate it for y time, then it must notify you with a sound to pour something else to it, then it must enable a heater for certain amouts of time, it must watch the color with a webcamera and stop when the color reaches a value, etc).

put the honest question up to yourself - would you hire a person who can write pixels on the screen with a vga driver? its prety impressive, but it does not worths anything.

computing have 3 layers. one is science, one is art, and one is business. you must at least understand two to create a living from it. 99% of people in this industry understands 0, 0.99% understands 1, and only the rest 0,01% can actually achieve things and live from it without becoming the libreoffice excel data guy in an office.

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Operating system for SUBLEQ cpu architecture:
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 Post subject: Re: Applications of OSDev
PostPosted: Sat Aug 19, 2017 9:40 am 
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I don't think that writing your own OS helps that much to find a job. At least, I don't think that it will help you more than doing other complex projects. Kernel and driver development is nothing "special" and requires the same set of skills as other complex projects like games, database engines, web browsers orvirtual machine monitors. However contributing to an existing OS (i.e. Linux) might help you to get a job where you can do OS development.


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 Post subject: Re: Applications of OSDev
PostPosted: Sat Aug 19, 2017 1:16 pm 
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Generally speaking, trying to "sell" your hobby OS to a prospective employer (as in, "this cool thing I did", not as in, "give me money for my OS") might not be that good an idea. There are several different ways this could give the wrong impression -- too nerdy, or not having a sense of scope, to name just two.

If you have a project that has "gotten somewhere", i.e. more than a "hello world" boot image, then by all means include it in your CV, and if the employer is interested in talking about it, do so. Just be aware that, unless they are hiring you to do OS-related work, getting too "worked up" on the subject might, again, send the wrong message. They want you to be enthusiastic about their projects, not yours. 8)

What working on an OS project will do for you is giving you experience with all the things that go beyond the "let's whip up an executable" kind of development. Version control. Issue tracking. Build systems. Test environments and automatizing. Documentation. Working with third-party APIs. If you're lucky, collaboration. All these are important experiences and skills, and they will make you a better developer, both in reality and on paper.

Then again, so would any other kind of software project that goes beyond the "let's whip up an executable" stage. The difference OS work makes, as opposed to e.g. a game, or a handy app, or a web application, is if your prospective employer deals in these kind of things.

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